Charity

15 posts categorized

July 31, 2014

Beyond Marketing: 4 Unexpected Uses for SMS

Depositphotos_9759045_xs

SMS messaging has become a key component of any mobile marketing strategy. It’s use as an advertising tool has been well documented – not least on this very organ – but there are all sorts of weird, wonderful ways to leverage the power of text. Schools, community groups, churches and even emergency services have begun incorporating SMS into their processes. We’ve cherry picked our favorite unusual uses of SMS messaging outside of the mobile marketing realm…

Finding Lost Pets

Companies like MobiPet are helping pet owners locate lost furry friends. When notified of a lost animal, they send photo alerts by text message to registered vets, animal shelters and pet owners within a 30 mile radius. Animal lovers have rallied round the idea which, unlike microchip implants, is non-invasive and requires no equipment apart from a camera-enabled mobile phone with text message capability.

Donating to Good Causes

Text-to-donate has proven highly effective at engaging people who don’t donate to charity by other methods. In 2007, a Super Bowl commercial raised $10,000 within seconds for the victims of the recent tsunami in Asia. The Haiti earthquake relief effort also benefitted from a text campaign, with the Red Cross eventually pulling in $32 million for victims. The success of text-to-donate is owed to the simplicity of the process. People too busy to go through the hassle of visiting a website and uploading credit card information can simply reply to a text message and have their donation applied to their phone bill.

Emergency Alerts

Closer to home, Hurricane Sandy – the second costliest hurricane in the US since records began – had a devastating impact on local businesses, but SMS proved to be a true survivor in the face of infrastructural collapse. Businesses and emergency services used SMS to keep residents up to date on the weather and how the damage it caused would affect them. 

Talking to Home Appliances

‘Smart appliances’ allow their owners to control them remotely via text message. Appliances are programmed to respond to a series of commands, so if you have an unexpected guest coming to your house, and you don’t have time to go home and clean, you can send a text to your robotic vacuum cleaner or mop. Intelligent SMS systems are also being used in fridges to tell owners what they need to pick up from the store, and even suggest recipe ideas!

March 19, 2014

Is Text-to-Tip The Future?

Depositphotos_19440963_xs

Starbucks has added a digital tipping feature to its mobile payment program, allowing customers to easily add tips to their purchases. The app will be available for iOS on March 19, 2014, with an Android option to launch later this year.

Users in the United States, Canada and the U.K. will enjoy access to this app, which provides customers with a two-hour window following a transaction to add a tip of 50cents, $1 or $2 to the bill. The subsequent digital receipt will reflect the added tip. Starbucks Mobile Pay has been available for three years and allows users to pay with a digital version of their Starbucks card on their smartphones. Entitled “Shake to Pay,” users simply shake their phones to pull up their Starbucks card barcodes and make payments.

"We're really excited because tipping has been something our customers have been really asking for," said Starbucks Chief Digital Officer Adam Brotman to CNET. "More and more customers...carry cash with them less and less these days. It's nice to be able to leave a tip for your barista and your store using mobile payment now on the iPhone app."

This is the first time mobile phone users will be able add tips to their digital bills. Some 10 million customers have already downloaded the Starbucks payment app, which covers about 11% of in-store purchases. It makes sense that the coffee giant added the tip option to this already wildly-successful mobile marketing strategy, and will undoubtedly set the bar for other companies who employ tipping. 

More and more companies are utilizing SMS messaging to promote their business or brand, including opt-in apps that alert customers to store sales, provide exclusive discounts and downloadable coupons, remind customers of appointments and much more. Most companies have found such mobile marketing tactics highly effective and are scrambling to come up with new and effective ways to maintain client relationships while simultaneously attracting new customers.

Restaurants, hotels and other customer service-based businesses and companies are likely to develop and market their own tipping apps, assuming Starbuck’s app is successful. Given how popular the company’s mobile payment app is, it is very likely the tipping option will be yet another successful mobile marketing strategy. Customers could easily tip those who clean their hotel rooms when checking out, or add a tip if using their smartphones to pay for takeout. Even smaller operations that use smartphones to take payments, such as independently-owned hair and nail salons, can benefit from tipping apps.

SMS messaging and subsequent mobile marketing tactics aren’t going anywhere! It therefore makes perfect sense for companies to continue to develop their mobile marketing strategy, whether it involves tipping apps or not! 

November 16, 2013

Leverage Mobile Marketing for Fundraising

 

 

Depositphotos_25147143_xs

Mobile marketing strategies used for commercial purposes can be equally effective in the non-profit and charity sector. Natural disasters and other emergency situations call for precisely the sort of instant response facilitated by texting, which is why charities and aid organizations all over the world are leveraging the power of SMS to generate awareness as well as monetary donations.

Earlier this year, World Vision used a typical mobile advertising strategy in the run-up to the Chicago marathon. They implemented a text program to inspire athletes preparing for the race, and found that those who got involved ultimately raised 50% more money than those who didn't. The informal messages allowed runners and spectators alike to share their experiences of participating in the fundraiser. In one instance, World Vision issued a message asking trainees to tell them how many runs they had completed that week. Those that hadn't run at all received the following message:

“Training is tough, but you can do it. Jump back into the training plan, and take it one day at a time.”

Another great application of common mobile marketing trends for charitable purposes was achieved by the Red Cross, during the 2010 Haiti earthquake. The organization launched a donate-by-text program, heavily promoted by the US government and on social media. According to a Pew internet report conducted in the aftermath of the appeal, half of all donors went on to encourage their friends and family to donate, and 76% of those people ultimately contributed money via text message. It was a classic mobile advertising strategy: get an informal message out to x amount of people, and rely on word-of-mouth to do the rest. The same happened after Hurricane Sandy. Nearly a million dollars was donated to the fund solely by text message

But why are mobile marketing solutions so effective for fundraising? In part, it's the payment process itself that appeals to people. By donating money via text instead of credit card, the transaction is made significantly easier, with less of the attendant stress regarding fraud, and just a lot less hassle. People tend to regard text costs as money already spent, so if they can put it towards a good cause, all the better. The convenience of the medium is perfect for generous people who feel they don't have time to fill in online forms, or send checks through the mail.

Finding the right time to ask for money is crucial to the success of such campaigns. According to recent statistics, Fridays and Mondays are the most rewarding times of the week. It's also important to stay in touch with users; give them regular updates about your charity's work so they can stay informed. By looking at successful mobile strategies for small business ventures, and adapting them to your fundraising appeal, you can achieve better results than for-profit companies can dream of. Look into starting your own mobile marketing strategies for charity fundraisers, and start making a real difference. 

 

February 21, 2012

5 DIY Digital Communication Tools to Highlight Your Cause

Entry By Jason Brick

Even more than a for-profit business, a non-profit cause needs to maximize its reach while minimizing expenses. DIY digital initiatives, because of their scalability, are some of the best ways to achieve this goal. Your organization is probably already using some digital communication tools, but here are others you should consider implementing.

Diy Digital

1. Flash Demonstrations

This is the most visible way to take advantage of mobile media. Using a text message broadcast, you can organize a meeting of followers with short notice and big results. Depending on your goals, the result can range from a simple presentation, to an artistic display, to a full-bore protest. 

2. Send Reports

Informing your contact list about your cause is key to keeping them involved and giving. A regular report citing statistics, recent developments, and progress made on projects, is a necessary part of your website. An occasional announcement, sent via text marketing, can serve as an extra "ping," to keep your cause front of mind.

3. Text-To-Give

A recent UK report found a 15% response rate for text-to-give fundraising efforts. While low compared to other methods, because the costs are small, text-to-give generates strong returns in spite of the low response rate. So, include a text-to-give message in your publicity initiatives, as well as in occasional broadcasts, to maximize the reach of this method. 

4. Go Viral

The power of digital media is in sharing. Encourage your original recipients to share your broadcasts with their network, and to ask their network to help spread the message as well. Remember, impactful and insightful messages are the most likely to get re-broadcast. As for humor, it can get a lot of shares, but may not be appropriate for your cause's message. Always err on the side of caution.

5. Integrate QR

Quick response codes are easy ways for a potential contact to get involved in your cause, and have a "gadget factor" that may draw some early adopters who would otherwise be less attracted to your organization. Plant your QR panel on bumper stickers, paperwork, fliers, print advertising -- even on your T-shirts. The more places that panel pops up, the better your response will be. 

 

Scam Alert

Unfortunately, more than a few scams have used digital media -- and especially text-to-give campaigns -- to draw fraudulent donations. Your organization will see the strongest results if you pair your digital media initiatives with a professional web and physical presence. This can help contacts feel safe about getting involved with and giving to your cause. 

 

December 12, 2011

Service-Based Marketing For Your Small Business

Service-Based Marketing For Your Small Business is the twelfth in a series of articles that we'll be posting this fall. Small Business Marketing Tips To Build Sales In A Down Economy will teach you how to use do-it-yourself tools like SMS, email and social media to effectively market your business.

Entry By Jason Brick

Give A Helping HandThe great thing about mobile media is that it's so cheap and easy anybody can do it

The bad thing about mobile media is that it's so cheap and easy anybody can do it. 

This double-edged media sword makes it hard for small businesses with small marketing budgets to stand out in the noisy crowd of electronic voices. Service-based marketing, though, will let you stand out in the best possible way: by giving back to the same community that keeps your business afloat.

Step One: Find a Cause
Choose a cause you care about, preferably one served by an agency or non-profit in your local area. Some examples include:

  • Reducing pollution
  • Hungry families
  • Homeless families
  • Diabetes (or Cancer or AIDS) awareness

Once you've chosen your cause, reach out to a nearby group dedicated to that problem. Most major metro areas will have one or more. Local chapters beat national organizations here because you'll have better opportunities for "face time."

Step Two: Plan an Event
Host an event – either at your location or in a prominent area like a parking lot at a major intersection – to raise funds for that cause. Use a "hook" somehow related to your business to make it memorable. Print coupons or gift certificates for everybody who participates.

Bushido Martial Arts of Hillsboro, Oregon, for example, collected over three tons of food by having students stand outside local grocery stores with signs saying "Will Teach Karate For Food." Everybody who came out of a store with a can for the l ocal food bank got a coupon for a free week of lessons.

Your event doesn't have to focus on fundraising; you can also focus on awareness – such as renting an air compressor to "top off" cars for free and improve gas mileage.

Step Three: Tell Everybody
Once you've set a date, it's time to activate your social media team.  Use every media channel you have access to, and spread the word. It's rarely worth it to pay for advertising, but you can write a press release for the local paper. The local group you've partnered with should help you with this – either with their own publicity team, or by providing graphics or other support.

Step Four: Broadcast Live
Use SMS, Twitter and Facebook to post ongoing progress reports on the day of your event. Let recipients know how many people are already there, about upcoming special speakers or other activities, and your progress towards your goal. You can also use the feed to organize a "flash presentation," by encouraging hard core fans to show up all at once.

Step Five: Recap
Send a follow-up press release to the local paper if you didn't get a reporter on scene. Send a mobile broadcast with thanks and final results. When you present your earnings to the local charity, get photos and post them on your website. Tell everybody about it, and include a coupon offer for  anybody who brings in a copy of the story.

Service-based marketing requires some creativity and a front-end filled with hard work. Used successfully, it's worth the investment of time and effort.

November 16, 2011

7 Ways Religious Groups Can Use Text Messaging To Build Community

Post By Angela Stringfellow

Imagine this: You’re sitting in church listening to the choir finish up your favorite hymn, when you hear a distinct buzz.  You turn around to see a church deacon pull out his phone and begin the two-thumb dance of replying to a text message.  

There’s can’t be much worse than seeing someone sitting in the middle of a religious service, listening to the sermon and texting.  But is there a way to blend the power of the SMS message with religious activities?

It's not a blasphemous question at all. Here is a list of 7 powerful ways SMS messaging can be used to better the religious community:

1. Prayer lists: The power of prayer is astonishing and there is power in numbers.  Often times, prayer lists are included in church bulletins and quarterly newsletters, often getting into the hands of the congregation days or weeks after the need first arises.  Miracles happen every day, most attributed to some sort of divine intervention.  Using text messaging can instantly get information into the hands of those who can provide prayer, positive thoughts and support to a family in need.

2. Message of the day: We’ve all seen quote-of-the-day calendars offering scripture or words of encouragement.  The quick quotes are designed to be motivating, re-affirming or simply just a reminder to live life honorably, graciously and with faith.  The simple task of sending an SMS message to the congregation will offer the same words of hope, faith and love.

3. Sermon /Bible study suggestions: For religious leaders who write their own sermons, writer's block is inevitable, and they often find themselves scrambling at the last minute to complete the story they want to share. A quick text to the congregation for suggestions can not only provide good ideas, but allow the congregation a sense of ownership over the content of the services.  In addition, having an interactive process allows the material to be relevant.  A quick poll can take a national statistic and make it local. In addition, SMS can be used to discuss topics for discussion at Bible studies or other educational forums.

4. Social service events/notifications: A flood, a fire, a family’s medical emergency. The need for help is often immediate. SMS texting can provide the perfect opportunity to reach out to vast numbers of people who can provide the resources needed in a time of crisis. Whether it’s rounding up the troops to help in the aftermath of a natural disaster or reminding volunteers of the canned food drive, the simple and quick notification can be the difference between a turnout of five and a turnout of 100.

5. Recruitment campaigns: Many churches, synagogues and religious institutions are struggling with attendance. Younger members are simply not attending as they once were. SMS messaging can be used to supplement recruitment campaigns by providing information on congregational meetings, religious services, youth group activities or simply to invite the community to a meet and greet.  The call-to-action alone may be enough to get a few people in the door.

6. Fund raising: If the church is in need of a new elevator, a roof, or perhaps a new organ, the contributions of its congregation are vital. Notifications used to be hung in parlors or on bulletin boards in the community. Now, the unobservant can be notified quickly and easily with a text message announcing the fund raising event. After the initial message it’s easy for those who received the message to pass it along to their social network.  Not only does this help raise the funds, but will help the organization gain community exposure and potentially bring new members through their doors with the event.

7. Religious news: People like to be informed.  Many young families are too busy with their lives to stop and take a moment to read the paper or even watch the news. What better way to share news that is pertinent to your congregation than to send a link via SMS.  On smartphones, the quick and simple links can be viewed and the congregation is now up-to-date on the latest news surrounding the religious community.

The fact of the matter is that texting is quick, easy and efficient.  The challenge is finding appropriate ways for the religious community to take advantage of the technologies available. By providing opportunities for members to interact, the community as a whole grows stronger; thus, accomplishing the ultimate goal: spreading the word.

How is your church or religious center using technology and SMS messaging? If you’re not using it, would you consider it?

Learn how other religous groups are using text messaging right now.

August 31, 2010

Saddleback Church builds sense of community with mobile

Shane Neman, Ez Texting's CEO, recently presented our case study of Saddleback Church at the DMA/Mobile Marketer Nonprofit Mobile Day:

Saddleback Church has a 360-degree mobile strategy in place that it uses to build a sense of community and increase charitable donations throughout its eight houses of worship.

The nonprofit uses SMS to make its services more interactive and to engage prospective members by integrating text messaging

...

The Church first began mobile marketing via SMS. The church used SMS to poll audiences. This was a means of building a sense of community. However, Saddleback also used the answers it got to segment its audience.

Consumers were asked to text SADDLEBACK to 313131.

Consumers that participated in the polls were asked a question, which they replied to with three possible answers. They were then asked to provide their email address.

Saddleback Church was able to send emails to participants based on their poll responses. There were three variations of the email communication; one for each of the possible poll answers.

Read the entire article at Mobile Commerce Daily

August 10, 2010

Making Donations Via SMS Messages

With the recent flooding in Pakistan which killed 1,400 people, numerous organizations are stepping up with a relatively new and popular way to make donations. The mGive Foundation and several of their partners have launched campaigns which allow people to text donations which will aid victims. In the past, texting donations has proven to be effective because it is guaranteed that they will arrive to their intended destination. It is also extremely easy and fast, once a person hears about the campaign they simply pull out their cell phones and make the donation. Even Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has made a donation via text message.

“I just texted a contribution myself, because we know from our own experience, particularly in Haiti, small donations can add up to make a big difference,” Secretary Clinton said earlier this week. “Americans have always shown great generosity to people facing crises worldwide. So I urge Americans to join this effort and send some much needed help to the people of Pakistan.”

To read the entire article and learn how you can help, click here.

March 26, 2010

Public Knowledge Wants You To Tell The FCC To Protect Freedom To Text!

Public Knowledge is a Washington, D.C.-based public interest group working to defend citizens' rights in the emerging digital culture. They have filed an important petition with the FCC:

Text messaging is a part of everyday life for people—a fast and convenient form of communication useful in every situation. Because of its importance, in 2007 Public Knowledge and others filed a petition with the Federal Communications Commission asking that it clarify that text messaging is subject to the same nondiscrimination rules as voice communications.

You can learn more about the petition (and sign on) @ http://www.publicknowledge.org/issues/text-message-petition

So why is this an issue? Let's look at an article in yesterday's New York Times:

When the earthquake devastated Haiti, Catholic Relief Services tried to gather contributions for its efforts using the hottest trend in giving: donations via cellphone.

But the charity wanted to try a twist on the technology: when people sent a text message to donate, they got a reply offering to connect them via phone to the charity’s call center. The group hoped that the calls could build a stronger bond with donors, and garner larger contributions as well.

But just three days into the effort after the Jan. 12 earthquake, the charity got word that Sprint Nextel was demanding that the “text-to-call” effort be shut down. The charity had 40 days to abandon the feature or lose access to millions of Sprint customers.

Sprint’s original motivations are murky; it said that an intermediary company had failed to properly fill out a form to verify that it was dealing with a legitimate charity.

The conflict underscores a problem that public interest groups asked the Federal Communications Commission to address more than two years ago: the hazy legal status of text messages, which are controlled by telephone companies without any real government oversight. The laws that prohibit phone companies from interfering with voice calls do not apply to text messages, a fast-growing medium.

“We should be able to communicate with people the way they want to be communicated with, not the way the phone company wants them to be communicated with,” said Jed Alpert, a founder of Mobile Commons, the company that connects Catholic Relief Services and 100 other nonprofit organizations with text messaging networks. 

Read more @ The New York Times.
Check out the petition here.

January 13, 2010

How To Donate To Haiti Relief Efforts Via Text Messaging

As you probably already know, Haiti has been devastated by 7.0 magnitude earthquake:

The earthquake, the worst in the region in more than 200 years, left the country in a shambles. As night fell in Port-au-Prince, Haiti’s capital, fires burned near the shoreline downtown, but otherwise the city fell into darkness. The electricity was out, telephones were not working and relief workers struggled to make their way through streets blocked by rubble.

So what can you do to help? The New York Times has a collection of information. If you want to donate money to relief efforts right now, using your cell phone, you have three options:

  • You can text HAITI to 90999 to donate $10 to Red Cross relief efforts in Haiti.
  • To make a $5 donation from your phone text "ONEHEART" to 85944 & confirm by replying "YES", or go to www.sophiasheart.org to make a donation.
  • Text the word “Haiti” to 85944 to donate $5 on behalf of the Rescue Union Mission and MedCorp International.
  • Text the word “Haiti” to 25383 to donate $5 On behalf of the Internal Rescue Committee.
  • Or, you can donate $5 to Earthquake Relief In Haiti by texting YELE to 501501 and visit www.yele.org (supported by Wycelf Jean)

P.S.  In the past we've covered other mobile-based charity efforts. Read about them.