Ez Texting

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June 23, 2016

SMS Can Help Smokers Kick the Habit

 

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Data collected from multiple recent studies show that SMS messages can help smokers kick their habits. Research focused on smokers receiving encouraging messages like “Be strong” and “You can do it!” revealed that these text interventions are helpful in getting smokers to abstain.

The researchers behind the study used meta analysis, a technique that combines findings from many independent studies, to arrive at their conclusion. The scientific team analyzed 20 manuscripts that documented 22 SMS messaging interventions dealing with curbing smoking in 20 countries. It sought out information about how mHealth text messaging – with a specific health issue in mind – could directly impact decisions made by individuals that could positively impact their states of wellness.

 

mHealth Via SMS Service to Meet People Where They Are

Receiving a personalized message regarding a health issue might be what it takes to get an individual to finally make the connection that choices are contributing to sickness. This is the focus of the mHealth text messages that are delivered straight to those who have agreed to participate in the trial. The SMS messages are short, direct, and supportive comments that remind receives about poor health choices and offer education. They’re messages a friend might send, and more.

The SMS interventions ideally will be adapted to suit the participants’ lives and natural environments. They’ll be on-point, regularly scheduled, convenient reminders to take immediate action toward smoking cessation (and hopefully other bad lifestyle choices in the future).

 

More Research and Trials are Needed

 

The study’s lead researcher, Lori Scott-Sheldon from Brown University, says that the evidence revealed in the trials provides inarguable support for the effectiveness of SMS messaging interventions. She offers that these messages have absolutely reduced smoking behavior, but more research is necessary to understand exactly how the interventions work, why they work, and under what conditions they’re most effective.

The Journal of Medical Internet Research published the study. Scott-Sheldon added that tobacco use is a preventable health issue and one of the leading preventable concerns. This is why, she purports, text messaging shows such promise. The SMS services are low cost, they’re able to reach a wide audience, and they don’t take many resources to implement. The mHealth messages, Sheldon-Scott says, should be a “public health priority” so that smokers can get the intervention they desperately need. 

Since SMS messaging has reached near-market saturation, it makes sense that the technology be used as an easy, cost-effective, and direct means to get health information out to the public – and to hopefully influence individuals in a way that creates immediate positive changes in their lifestyles. 

There are not many groups in the United States, or in the world, who do not have access to text messaging, and therefore the potential for an SMS service like the stop-smoking texts is great. A senior research scientist at The Mirian Hospitals Centres for Behavioural and Preventative Medicine, Beth Bock says that widespread availability of a good stop-smoking program can make a powerful statement – and impact – on public health.

June 17, 2016

Text Ban Lifted by Joint Commission

 

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The Joint Commission - the largest healthcare accreditation body in the United States - announced last month that it will start allowing physicians to make patient orders by text message. The move is a huge victory for MHealth advocates. 

The news was happily received by healthcare providers, who see text messaging as the most efficient and reliable method of communication, and mobile technology developers who can access a potentially huge new market. For both groups, this feels like a long-overdue update to regulations that have hobbled natural progress towards emergent technologies that will ultimately benefit patients.

The changes were made in response to a 2011 FAQ document issued by the Joint Commission, which stated that text message orders were prohibited due to security concerns. In a dramatic reversal of that position, it now says text messaging is permissible within certain parameters.

 

What are the Parameters?

Changes to the regulations reflect a shifting culture in which SMS is the communication platform that most people feel comfortable using. But it’s not open season; the new guidelines don’t simply allow clinicians to send text messages to anyone as part of their job. The Joint Commission has provided a number of specific requirements for organizations using SMS:

 

  • Encrypted messaging
  • A secure registration process
  • Delivery and read receipts
  • Date and time stamps
  • A specified contact list of people authorized to receive and record orders
  • Customized policies and procedures

 

The Joint Commission also recommends that healthcare providers closely track and document the capabilities, limitations and uptake of their SMS platform, and develop a risk-management strategy. 

 

Why Now?

Doctors - like everyone else - have come to rely on smartphones as a tool for optimizing their time and improving communication. Unlike everyone else, the information they need to share is sensitive and highly personal; security is paramount. The healthcare industry is subject to strict regulations, and any new legislation takes a long time to draft, pass and enact. The legal process moves - necessarily - as slowly as it ever has, but technology changes at an ever-increasing rate (subject only to Moore’s Law). This developmental dissonance means there is a significant lag between technology becoming available to consumers, and being ready for use by industries dealing with their private data.

Thankfully, mobile communication legislation is beginning to reflect the realities of the modern world - and this can only be a positive thing for the healthcare industry and all who rely on it.

June 06, 2016

SMS: King of Digital Marketing

 

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SMS is increasingly an essential part of any mobile marketing campaign, as it offers an inexpensive and highly effective way to engage with target audiences. It also provides real-time marketing messages that most people read quickly, especially compared to email. Let’s look at why SMS is such an excellent option for reaching customers and how to ensure you’re getting the results you want: 

 

Permission-Based

The mobile marketing strategy is wholly permission-based, as the user must opt in to receive messages. This establishes and fosters trust between the consumer and the business. It also allows businesses to assume consumers really want to read their messages. 

 

High Open Rate

As previously mentioned, SMS has a high open rate, as more than 90 percent of text messages are read within three minutes. Email campaigns average about 22 percent, while Twitter and Facebook post rates are at about 29 percent and 12 percent, respectively. Text messages are short and to the point, unlike lengthy emails, and are also relatively infrequent.

 

Mobile-Native

More and more businesses are optimizing their websites and emails for the mobile realm, something text messages don’t require. They’re already mobile friendly! There’s no interface or training problems with SMS marketing campaigns, as most people already know how to send a text message. 

 

More Willing

Most customers are willing to share their phone numbers with businesses so they can receive promotional alerts. Even more people are happy to provide their phone numbers and receive promotional messages if they include a discount or other incentive. 

 

Here to Stay

Yet another reason SMS is such a marketing gold mine is that it’s not going anywhere anytime soon. Most people prefer texting to getting phone calls. Additionally, despite the plethora of messaging apps and related platforms, people still gravitate toward text messages. 

 

SMS Mobile Marketing Tips

Get Permission

Whatever else, it’s important to ensure permission is granted before sending promotional text messages. Unsolicited messages and emails are never welcome, and only annoy one target demographic after another. Permission is essential and prevents promotional text messages from landing in the customer’s “spam” folder or just being deleted.

Know When It’s Appropriate

Understand when it’s best to send promotional text messages and when to remain silent. SMS doesn’t apply to every single marketing campaign, and it’s more personal than email. Follow email marketing practices for best results and avoid sending messages too often. Additionally, you should think about consumer location and the best time of day to send messages, and steer clear of overly wordy language. 

Make It Valuable

Provide consumers with something of value when sending text messages, such as an alert about an upcoming sale or event or a promo code for an exclusive discount. Messages should add to consumer experiences with the brand and not fall into the ‘self-serving’ category. 

SMS: cost effective...and just plain effective. 

May 24, 2016

Building a Personal Connection with B2B Buyers

 

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People running businesses know that successfully selling products or services to consumers means making personal connections with those consumer. Buyers typically want to fill an emotional need with a purchase, so companies and brands need to set out to be the perfect entity to fill that need. A consumer’s desire to be prettier, skinnier, and happier fuels sales in the B2C market, but does that same desire translate to the B2B industry? Not exactly, but we can look to personal connection as a way to drive sales in B2B niches when we consider that business buyers too want to feel emotionally and personally satisfied. Therefore, to successfully sell to B2B buyers, you must focus your marketing efforts on creating personal value for a human, emotional B2B buyer. You can do this through many channels, including SMS marketing.

 

What Drives the B2B Buyer

 

B2B buyers often have a lot at stake when it comes to making the right decisions for their companies. They feel pressured to purchase products that will represent their businesses in the right ways, give their customers a consistent image of their brand, and show their higher-ups that they have a solid grasp of their company’s vision and values. This means that B2B buyers consider emotional needs, such as their reputation and their capability for adding value, when they look for products to purchase.

 

Call it emotional buying, ego purchasing, or making choices based on intuition. Just don’t ignore it. B2B buyers are human beings that can be influenced in many ways similar to B2C buyers. They might have facts, figures, and a company’s bottom line in mind when they make a purchasing decision, but they’re also looking for perceived value when they buy and you should be trying to give them that value. You can offer value by positioning your company as a business that’s trustworthy and reputable to work with, a creator of products that have integrity, and an organization that efficiently delivers exactly what you say you will, when you say it.

 

The Data Supports Emotion Driving B2B Buyers

 

Google and the CEB Marketing Leadership Council surveyed about 3,000 B2B buyers a few years ago in hopes of finding out what drives their purchasing decisions. The results of the market research showed that 50 percent of B2B buyers will probably buy from a company that they feel emotionally tied to. Compare this data to a study done by market research firm Motista, which organized baseline data from B2C purchasers, and you’ll see similar findings. 

 

The Google and CEB survey surprised many in the B2B industry because it indicated that more than 50 percent of B2B buyers approach making purchasing decisions the same way that regular consumers do, which means they look for personal value. What was even more shocking to some B2B business owners is that the research showed buyers were eight times more likely to pay a premium price for a product or service if they felt they were receiving greater personal value.

 

How to Build a Personal Connection with a B2B Customer

 

When you realize that a real person is somewhere behind every buying decision a company makes, you can set yourself up to best meet those buyers’ needs. To be the business that makes the sale, it’s important to be friendly, easy-to-work-with, and likeable. Do this, of course, by offering honest and sincere phone and in-person communication, as well as outstanding products and services. However, you should also use your SMS marketing tactics to build personal connections with B2B buyers and let them know that communication that meets their needs is important to you. 

 

You can use text marketing to stay in touch with buyers and let them know about new inventory. Follow up on purchases with personal texts that ask for product or service feedback, and inquire via text about any future purchase needs a B2B buyer might have. Let your B2B buyers know that you are respectful of their time and don’t want to send out excessive email or text blasts, but that you’re ready to serve should they have needs or problems.

Use SMS technology to meet B2B buyers where they are, which often means recognizing that they’re human beings who constantly want to stay informed and create value for their companies, and themselves. Take advantage of the opportunity to make any genuine personal connection you can with your B2B buyers, via text messaging and other means, and they’ll likely become long-time, loyal purchasers.

March 30, 2016

The Play with 160 Characters

 

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‘Please ensure mobile devices are switched on before the commencement of the performance’ is not something you expect to hear as a theater patron. But that’s exactly what audiences at Fredericton’s Theatre New Brunswick were asked to do for Returning Fire, a play looking at the struggles faced by a former soldier trying to reintegrate into society.

Penned by local playwright Ryan Griffith, Returning Fire tells the story of a soldier in the Canadian Armed Forces returning home from the war in Afghanistan. While trying to reconnect with a friend from his youth, the soldier is haunted by the ghosts of war and the spectre of PTSD, all too common among veterans. 

The play - set in Fredericton - recently completed a short run at the New Brunswick. It’s themes of lost innocence and battle scarred psyches have been explored by plenty of dramatists before, but the production takes a thrilling new approach to the theatrical experience, harnessing mobile technology to engage audiences in a way that pushes conventional boundaries. Indeed, Returning Fire not only dispenses with theater conventions - it largely dispenses with the theater  altogether.

The majority of the story is told through text messages. Ticket holders become audience members at 4pm, when the first text comes through. For the next four hours, the play unfolds as dialogue between the two principal characters, culminating in the revelation of a secret location in Fredericton where the physical denouement will take place. The anticipation builds as audience members converge at the location to witness the live reunion of the characters.

The playwright relished the challenge of creating an entirely new kind of theater using the lexicon of SMS. “It was a lot of fun to recreate that kind of dialogue,” he told the Aquinian. “For me, it was as fun to write as a normal play.”

A Griffith suggests, the appeal of the concept goes beyond a gimmicky use of technology. It’s about the effect that text messaging has had on the way we communicate: the abbreviations, the misunderstandings about intent and tone - even the agony of silence, which takes on a different dimension when the characters aren’t sharing the same physical space. 

Artistic Director Thomas Morgan Jones says Griffith’s work is “able to boldly challenge notions of what live theatre is… by exploring the use of technology in theatre.” 

That exploration was facilitated by Ez Texting, who provided the platform through which the drama unfolds. Morgan Jones says the production would not have been possible without us:

“The idea behind the play was to have two characters text messaging each other three and a half hours before the live play would start. The audience would then receive these text messages on their own phones. During the texts, they would discover where these characters planned to meet in the city of Fredericton, and could then travel to that location to watch the play. When we came up with the idea, we had no idea how we would do it. Thankfully, we found EZTexting.”

As other theaters consider producing Returning Fire, Morgan Jones hopes the unlikely alliance between mobile technology and drama will continue to develop, with Ez Texting’s SMS service his “first recommendation for bringing the play to life” in future productions.

The future of theatrical drama lies with those dramatists willing to break with convention. Although this is the first time text messaging has been used to stage a play, the innovation is part of a wider trend towards a radical reinterpretation of theatre as we know it. 

Returning Fire is a story about the isolation of PTSD and the difficulty of making human connections in an increasingly atomized world. It’s creator has not only recognized the role played by online communication in fueling and normalizing that atomization, but brought it to life as a distinct and vital character.

March 23, 2016

Do Good Week: Maintaining a Positive Company Culture

 

As part of this year's 'Do Good Week' we take a look at how you can inspire and maintain a positive company culture. 

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In order to do well in business, you need to maintain a positive company culture. What is a company culture and how do you create one that positively impacts your business, and therefore your customers? Company culture is a shared set of visions and values for the betterment of the company and those it serves, and it’s a collective effort to uphold those visions and values through every business decision and action.

 

Examples of a Positive Company Culture

A positive company culture is seen in the way leadership communicates with employees, in the enthusiasm employees have when performing their jobs, and in the effectiveness of the company to better the lives of its customers. Companies like The Disney Store have created a positive company culture by taking into consideration all of the above-mentioned points, and companies that are successful in creating a positive culture tend to experience enormous success.

 

The Importance of Positive Company Culture

It’s important that a company’s founder set the tone for a positive culture from day one. His or her visions and values can then be passed on to first-hire leadership, employee teams that are built subsequently, and any vendors or merchants that are representative of the company. It’s crucial that anyone who joins the company, in any capacity, is aware of the positive company culture that has been built and prepared to help maintain it. 

A positive company culture must be practiced and on display at all times in order to keep the business thriving. This means that anyone who is not on board with the culture that the company has created needs to decide to adopt a new attitude or face the consequences. Culture is that dire for a business’ success. 

 

How to Create and Maintain a Positive Company Culture

The culture a company creates for employees, and for customers, will be slightly different from one business to the next because of factors like the nature of business, the business’ target audience, and business location, among others. However, in the end, a positive company culture will be focused on a few things, including clear communication, fair dealing, and the happiness of employees and customers. The following are some goals a business can focus on to create a company culture that benefits management, shareholders, employees, and customers:

 

Recruit the Right People

To create a positive company culture, start with a leadership team that understands and embraces the business’ vision and values, and then make sure everyone who comes on board in any other capacity is clear and accepting of the culture. When you screen employees, hold willingness to uphold your company’s culture as a “must.” This will help your business by getting the right people into your company from day one, which means less turnover later. 

 

Commit to Orientations and Ongoing Training

Make it a requirement that every person who comes to work for your company go through an orientation that specifically addresses the company culture you’ve created. Also, make periodic training classes a requirement so that employees can receive updates to your visions and values (as they might change according to the state of an evolving business) and reminders about your company’s ultimate goals. 

In addition to these methods of maintaining a positive company culture, it’s a good idea to foster company-wide communication at every level, consider recognition and awards programs for those who go above and beyond in upholding your business’ values, and generate an atmosphere of caring in which employees feel connected and comfortable with each other, like a family. 

 

March 21, 2016

Chinese Mobile Companies Muscle in on Apple and Samsung's Territory

 

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Do you like the idea of a cell phone that has all the latest technology at a cheap price? A lot of people in China do, which is why Chinese brands like OPPO and TCL are closing in on the mobile market that Apple and Samsung have dominated for years.

It’s likely that the European and United States markets will appreciate an all-the-frills cell phone for a steal, too. 

Little-known tech companies in China are hoping that consumers will find their low-cost Android mobile devices attractive and turn to them over the now-more-popular competition. Even small Chinese brands, such as Xiaomi and Huawei, are giving the front-runners in the industry a bit to think about in terms of product cost.

 

What Does the Future Hold for Chinese Mobile Brands?

At the recent Mobile World Congress, a wireless show that was held in Barcelona this year, TCL, Hauwei, and Xiaomi revealed high-end cell phones that are part of an ambitious plan to take over the market. Xiaomi usually launches its phones in China, but the company was compelled to announce its new Mi 5 at the Mobile World Congress and steal the show from its well-established competitors. 

Will there be an audience for this new type of Chinese smartphone? Probably, considering what AndroidPIT editor Shu On Kwok implies when he says, “The Chinese smartphone vendors have a very unique feature - it is the price.” 

In today’s market, it’s common to get a standard collection of features from one Android device to the other. With a large group of consumers not needing functionality beyond what’s typical and necessary, innovation might take a backseat to price.

With the new Chinese phones coming on to the market, cell phone buyers get nearly the same features as high-end Apple and Samsung model phones for a much lower price. 

 

What Do Consumers Really Want?

During 2015, Samsung’s market share declined, and Apple forecasted its first decline in revenue in more than 12 years. These companies are going to need to prove that their products are worth the significant difference in price if they’re going to succeed and keep dominating the market.

Apple has tried to keep a stronghold on the smartphone market by positioning itself as a company with many exclusive hardware and software offerings. However, consumers have often been able to get features on Android devices that are similar to the brilliance that Apple is touting, and these buyers are completely okay with that “close enough” ideology.

So, if “close enough” is good enough to keep people from buying Apple products, it may be all that’s needed to make them opt for Chinese brands that offer similar features and functions. Samsung has all but stated that it’s not concerned about the Chinese mobile companies. Its mobile chief, D.J. Koh, said, "We have other ideas,” meaning that Samsung is depending on technology beyond mobile phone features, such as a virtual-reality headset that offers a 360-degree camera and is compatible with the company’s Galaxy phones. 

It seems that Apple and Samsung might need to keep reaching beyond their mobile phone markets to stay dominant in the future, and they might need to adjust their attention to include the needs of gamers and other tech enthusiasts.  

February 19, 2016

SMS and the Customer Experience

 

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Did you know texting has been around for nearly 20 years? It’s hard to imagine life without it, and yet only recently have big businesses started to pay close attention to text and SMS messaging. Which makes you wonder, why now? What are they up to?

 

Texting Tipping Point 

The Pew Research Center reports that texting is the most frequently used app on a cell phone—97 percent of Americans use texting at least once a day. When compared to average email open rates (20 percent), text messages score significantly higher at 98 percent.

The numbers all point toward mobile, which is no surprise in 2016; the difference between what marketers know today versus 5 years ago is that the customer experience now begins is the palm of the hand. 

There are several reasons that businesses are more inclined to entertain SMS messaging. First, 15 years ago, a basic SMS plan was expensive: 10 – 20 cents a message. Thanks to unlimited text messaging, texting is more affordable. 

Additionally, the devices we use to text now are much more sophisticated. Remember typing messages using the number pad and T9? Today, most cell phones are equipped with full keyboards that make texting faster and more efficient. These factors have made it much more cost efficient for businesses to utilize texting in a meaningful way. 

 

Big Business Learns to Text 

So, what exactly are companies planning to do with texting? 

Big businesses are focusing on existing customer behavior, which in this case means texting. Based on statistical data, businesses view texting as the preferred form of communication. Instead of asking customers to call a 1-800 number, they’re going to meet customers where they already are—via text.  

There are three ways texting will be integrated into big business to ensure the customer experience is managed from this new mobile point. 

First, contact centers will incorporate SMS messaging with traditional voice calls to help customers solve problems faster, reduce wait times, and follow up. Normally, an agent handles calls one at a time; with texting, an agent can take multiple inquires simultaneously, effectively reducing wait times and increasing productivity. 

Second, smart notifications will be used as reminders and to set up appointments. 

Finally, desk phone messaging will bridge SMS messaging and MMS into a regular desk telephone, giving mobile employees access to multiple text sessions at the same time. 

 

Text to Buy 

Ironically, the social behavior of texting hasn’t chanced the customer’s experience; rather it has changed customer’s expectations about what that experience should be. In this case, texting is the path of least resistance to settle all kinds of customer issues. However, it’s also open season for innovation and integration of new technologies that will allow customers to buy things via text—something I predict we’ll see a lot more of in the near future. 

 

 

 

January 03, 2016

The App That's Keeping Tour Operators in Touch with Tourists

 

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There’s a new app designed to keep tour operators in contact with tourists while on their way to local attractions. Recently launched in New Zealand, the app was developed by Auckland-based company Skoot in a joint effort with JUCY, Tourism Radio and Putti, a Spark Ventures company. The app allows businesses to cater to tourists planning the next leg of their vacations. 

 

A Plethora of Functions

Skoot is available as a smartphone app that may be mounted to a rental vehicle. It offers a variety of functions, including onboard GPS navigation, safety messages, information on local activities, WiFi hotspot, and accommodation options in real time. The app also allows tourists to make purchases through stored credit cards on their smartphones. 

Skoot CEO Hayden Braddock notes the app is a built-in audio tour guide that recognizes user location and automatically provides information on over 1,600 local tourist attractions.

“Throughout their journey, Skoot is designed to keep tourists engaged with both local information and relevant promotions - served by audio and digital display feeds,” says Braddock. “Each business on Skoot will effectively have control over their own application which is able to be accessed and used within the Skoot application or on its own in the APP Store. The retailer gets the benefit of being able to create and manage their own app and content in real time, update deals, products, info, branding etc. Tourists will only have to download the one app when they travel around.”

Braddock added that he and other company members believe this is the first time something like this has been done. He also noted that the app will be linked to its nationwide 4G network that allows up to five other devices to use the WiFi hotspot when installed in a rental vehicle. 

 

Future Uses and Safety Promotion

Future incarnations of the app will include a click-to-call function using VoIP. The feature makes it possible for tourists to call and book local attractions for free.

“Tourists are also able to redeem digital vouchers which appear as they close in on local attractions and purchase their tickets at discounted rates using a preloaded credit card,” says Braddock.

The app promotes road safety by helping tourists navigate New Zealand roads and deal with assorted conditions as they arise. Drivers will be alerted to safety hazards such as high crash areas and one-way bridges, as well as when to stay left or slow down. 

Braddock commented that the app will provide more opportunities for the company’s business partners in the future, such as payment methods that encourage tourists to purchase promotional tickets to events and attractions and subsequently expedite their entry. Businesses will also be able to tailor their offerings based on the season, proximity, and other factors. 

Whether the app will be usable in other countries is unknown at this time, however its benefits make the possibility very real. 

December 22, 2015

Google Brings App Streaming to Mobile Ads

 

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Google launched a new way to find information last month, even if such information is locked up tight within a mobile app. The search engine’s “Trial Run” gives consumers 60 seconds of playtime before deciding whether they want to make the app a member of their home screen. Google made it so advertisers pay only when a consumer installs the app rather than every time someone opts for a trial run. That way, advertisers are paying for those truly interested in the game, not consumers who download on a wing and a prayer. 

"The immersive demo increases the likelihood that an install is coming from someone who enjoys playing the game," according to the blog post written by Google director of mobile ads Sissie Hsiao and product manager Pasha Nahass. "Users get a taste of the game before going through the download process, and the app developer attracts better qualified users who've chosen the game based on their experiences in the app."

The format is designed to offset recent Google research that found one in four downloaded apps never gets used. Trial run ads are currently behind one third of all mobile app revenue, with advertisers very willing to pay more for them because they result in actual downloads. Of course, if the consumer downloads and ignores the app in question, it’s not worth much to advertisers. This new option subsequently offers the chance to increase brand awareness by ensuring the person will (probably) use the app. 

 

Changes to Interactive Ads

Google also announced an HTML5 ad for interactive interstitial ads. The idea is to create a customized user experience designed specifically for every advertiser’s app. The search engine touts the ads as providing creative freedom to advertisers who utilize HTML5 as opposed to a standard template. Interstitial ads give advertisers the chance to display products through galleries and point out personal branding options. Global fashion retailer Zalora, for example, is using the feature so consumers can swipe for exclusive offers. 

"We understand that experiences on mobile need to be made for mobile, and an ad is no different," Hsiao and Nahass said. "We're continually exploring new and better ways to build out interactive formats for the small screen."

Both of these possibilities are still in the beta testing stage and therefore available to a handful of advertisers. 

“You can buy ads, you can get apps installed. But a lot of apps are used once or they’re never used, even after they’re installed,” Hsiao noted, emphasizing that the formats are designed to pair app developers with the right users. “We found that 1 in 4 apps is never even used, and there’s often this ‘try once’ experience, and then [the app is] never used again,” Hsiao adds.

Google noted that app developers interested in joining the beta should contact their account managers.