Mobile Forecasts

159 posts categorized

March 21, 2016

Chinese Mobile Companies Muscle in on Apple and Samsung's Territory

 

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Do you like the idea of a cell phone that has all the latest technology at a cheap price? A lot of people in China do, which is why Chinese brands like OPPO and TCL are closing in on the mobile market that Apple and Samsung have dominated for years.

It’s likely that the European and United States markets will appreciate an all-the-frills cell phone for a steal, too. 

Little-known tech companies in China are hoping that consumers will find their low-cost Android mobile devices attractive and turn to them over the now-more-popular competition. Even small Chinese brands, such as Xiaomi and Huawei, are giving the front-runners in the industry a bit to think about in terms of product cost.

 

What Does the Future Hold for Chinese Mobile Brands?

At the recent Mobile World Congress, a wireless show that was held in Barcelona this year, TCL, Hauwei, and Xiaomi revealed high-end cell phones that are part of an ambitious plan to take over the market. Xiaomi usually launches its phones in China, but the company was compelled to announce its new Mi 5 at the Mobile World Congress and steal the show from its well-established competitors. 

Will there be an audience for this new type of Chinese smartphone? Probably, considering what AndroidPIT editor Shu On Kwok implies when he says, “The Chinese smartphone vendors have a very unique feature - it is the price.” 

In today’s market, it’s common to get a standard collection of features from one Android device to the other. With a large group of consumers not needing functionality beyond what’s typical and necessary, innovation might take a backseat to price.

With the new Chinese phones coming on to the market, cell phone buyers get nearly the same features as high-end Apple and Samsung model phones for a much lower price. 

 

What Do Consumers Really Want?

During 2015, Samsung’s market share declined, and Apple forecasted its first decline in revenue in more than 12 years. These companies are going to need to prove that their products are worth the significant difference in price if they’re going to succeed and keep dominating the market.

Apple has tried to keep a stronghold on the smartphone market by positioning itself as a company with many exclusive hardware and software offerings. However, consumers have often been able to get features on Android devices that are similar to the brilliance that Apple is touting, and these buyers are completely okay with that “close enough” ideology.

So, if “close enough” is good enough to keep people from buying Apple products, it may be all that’s needed to make them opt for Chinese brands that offer similar features and functions. Samsung has all but stated that it’s not concerned about the Chinese mobile companies. Its mobile chief, D.J. Koh, said, "We have other ideas,” meaning that Samsung is depending on technology beyond mobile phone features, such as a virtual-reality headset that offers a 360-degree camera and is compatible with the company’s Galaxy phones. 

It seems that Apple and Samsung might need to keep reaching beyond their mobile phone markets to stay dominant in the future, and they might need to adjust their attention to include the needs of gamers and other tech enthusiasts.  

March 15, 2016

Facebook May Bring Back SMS Integration

 

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If you loved being able to message your Facebook friends without having to go through the site, you might have been bummed when Facebook pulled the functionality from Android phones almost three years ago.

The company did away with its Facebook Messenger App due to lack of interest on a broad scale. But now, thanks to a new application of which Android Police has obtained screenshots, it looks like you may once again be able to text your Facebook pals with the ease of opening up one phone or tablet app.

 

The Mysterious Messaging Application

Apparently, the mysterious app is a test application. Facebook has told The Verge it’s “testing the ability for people to easily bring all their conversations – from SMS and Messenger – to one place.” 

The app seems to bring a combination of functions and features, similar to those found in Google Hangouts, together to give users a simple way to send and receive SMS texts as well as Facebook messages.  

Facebook reps say that the test application will be an easy way to see SMS messages and respond to them, all in one place. Users will be able to identify in Messenger whether they want to access their SMS messages in the application, so that the messages they read frequently will be stored together.

 

Will Facebook Take Over How We Use SMS Messaging?

It appears that Facebook might want to take charge of how Android users read, send, and store their SMS messages. The company has recently launched support for its Android Messenger app that allows for multiple account integration. 

When Facebook first came out with its Messenger App in 2012, the social media giant said that it would not be possible for users to store texts or use the app’s features on the web version of its platform. However, this time, things might be different. Facebook hasn’t commented on whether or not the new Messaging App will come with the same restrictions, but we’re guessing that it might not – or at least that it will be more user friendly in terms of SMS integration, because the company will certainly want to take an aggressive stab at beating out Apple’s iMessage application that is already allowing seamless text coordination.

 

How Do You Get the New Messenger App?

Right now, select Android users are able to get the new Facebook Messenger App. To see if your device allows you to switch over to the new functionality of SMS integration, you can check for a “Change SMS App” option in Messenger’s settings. Facebook says that the feature is optional, so you absolutely don’t have to route all of your SMS messaging into this central location if you would rather not do so.

 

March 14, 2016

Top New York Hospital Embraces Mobile Technology

 

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People use mobile technology in many aspects of their lives, from ordering to-go meals and finding the closest coffee shops to banking and getting consumer ratings. Now, folks can turn to mobile technologies, including apps, to help them with something else: healthcare.

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital is adopting mobile platforms, such as apps, to take care of many patient needs and to make providing healthcare easier for doctors. The No. 1 hospital in New York recently launched the NewYork-Presbyterian app for phones and tablets, which enhances the experience of patients and gives them more ways to communicate with the hospital. 

They’ll be able to get in touch with physicians through the application and use an online payment system to settle bills. The app offers assistance navigating around the hospital, viewing information about services and medical professionals, and connecting with NewYork-Presbyterian’s social media channels.

 

A Health Care App for the Way We Live Our Lives

Since mobile technology has become so integrated in day-to-day living, the NewYork-Presbyterian app makes sense. It’s in its infancy, so there’s room for it to grow and become more perfect, but it’s a useful tool for people looking for a simple way to stay informed and correspond with those assisting with their care.

“If you were to come in for an operation, you would be able to give your loved one’s phone number to the registration desk and while you are having your operation, it sends automated messaging to your loved one’s phone number,” says NYP Chief Innovation Officer Peter Fleischut. The app allows you to make sure friends and family members are updated in real time, so that they always know what’s going on. 

Future updates to the NewYork-Presbyterian app will include a telehealth feature that allows for scheduling of follow-up visits and remote patient monitoring. The anticipated version of the application will also have a visitor’s guide and a way for users to request second opinions from doctors.

 

The InnovateNYP: Pediatric App Challenge

Along with the NewYork-Presbyterian app, the hospital has recently launched the InnovateNYP: Pediatric Challenge, a contest that asks techies and forward-thinkers to come up with games, creative tools, and activities to encourage the best healthcare for our kids. The Challenge is open to hospital employees and the public, and it’s the first of its kind, bringing designers, developers, technologies, and clinicians together in an effort to advance new ideas in pediatric care. The kick-off activity for the Pediatric Challenge is a 10-week InnovateNYP: Pediatric Appathon that will have participants from around the world creating what will hopefully be the next huge advancement in healthcare for children.

 

Patients Are Embracing Mobile Technology to Make Important Health Decisions

Fleischut says that patients are embracing the hospital’s mobile offers, in particular the text feature that lets them get in touch with the hospital when they need to. However, the actual usefulness of this feature, as well as the importance of future additions to the app and the hospital’s technology, is yet to be determined.

“It’s one thing to get initial downloads but I’m more interested in being able to engage with our users,” Fleischut stated. “How long are they staying in the application? How frequently are they coming back to the application?” 

With the tech community involved in the venture, there’s likely to be constant monitoring of the processes to build technology for the hospital that focuses on exactly what patients and medical staff need.

 

February 18, 2016

Mobile Is Starting to Dominate Online Gambling

 

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One of the many digital markets that mobile technology has advanced is the online gaming industry. The increase in smartphone and tablet use has resulted in a serious increase in gaming activity that will only become more significant over the next few years. 

According to mobile analysts from Juniper Research, the number of players using smartphones and other mobile devices to gamble online will increase by a staggering 100 million over the next five years. The total number of mobile gambling users is expected to reach 160 million by 2018. 

 

Attracting New Players Every Day

Mobile gaming is attracting new players all the time, thanks to innovative options for playing and interacting with other gamblers. Playing mobile casino games with gamblers around the world is one of the ways the online gaming landscape is changing, while online casino platforms are more readily available in gamble-friendly states such as New Jersey and Nevada. 

 

A More Immersive Gambling Experience

Players are increasingly leaving their desktops and laptops behind in favor of mobile device gambling, which provides a more immersive, more convenient experience. Gambling operators are scrambling to keep up, and many hope to earn at least half their online revenues from mobile sources in the coming years. 

 

Serious Spike In UK Gambling Revenue

The UK online gambling industry has benefitted greatly from mobile technology, as industry revenue increased from £5.6 billion ($8.07 billion) in 2010 to £7.1 billion ($10.2 billion) in 2014. Numbers are expected to climb even higher by 2018. 

 

The Global Online Gambling Market Report

The Global Online Gambling Market: Trends And Opportunities is a 60-page research report on the online gaming industry that noted the huge increase in gaming worldwide and unsurprisingly projected an even greater increase over the next five years. The report includes detailed regional analysis of Europe, North America, Asia, and the Middle East, and also takes a look at key market opportunities. 

Additionally, the report highlights factors driving the online gaming market. They include an increase in mobile use, resulting in more mobile gaming, and assorted technological advancements contributing to online gaming expansion. Tech advancements have also contributed to an increase in customer demographics. 

 

Two Major Challenges

The report notes two major mobile challenges faced by online gaming companies. The first is viable software handling, and the other is cyber security issues. 

 

Other Gaming Industry Changes

In addition to revolutionizing the online gaming industry, mobile technology is also taking gamers away from their consoles. Mobile video games such as Clash of Clans and Angry Birds arguably led the way, with global mobile game revenue in the billions. 

 

Problematic for Those With Gambling Issues?

One potential problem regarding the accessibility of this gambling option is what it will mean for those with gambling addictions. Games that are readily available on mobile devices could lead to problems for players who traditionally had to wait until they were home or at the casino to gamble. 

 

January 16, 2016

Hyperlocal Messaging App Partners with Twitter

 

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What could possibly be easier than making purchases online? A new localized messaging app called Lookup is attempting to make things easier with offline initiatives. Lookup, a Bangalore-based free messaging app is taking over consumer’s offline space, helping to deliver food, book flights and schedule appointments. 

In January this year, CEO and Founder of Lookup, Deepak Ravindran, raised $382K in seed capitol, which included money from Twitter co-founder Biz Stone. 

Nine months after the seed funding round, Ravindran locked in $2.5 million in series A funding led by Narayana Murthy’s Catamaran Ventures, Global Founders Capital and again, Biz Stone, to name but a few. 

 

Social Networking

It was no surprise when, at the end of last year, Lookup officially partnered with Twitter, adding some 350 million active Twitter users to the app’s growing user base. According to Ravindran, the partnership will be mutually beneficial. 

“Our idea is to make Lookup ubiquitous," said Ravindran. “Twitter's real-time communications platform could not be skipped for Lookup's on-demand local commerce service.”

Local service is what Lookup is all about. Using chat features already available in most smartphones, users simply text or chat special requests to Lookup—things like dinner reservations, movie tickets, hair appointments and more. 

With Twitter now onboard, the service will implement use of a Twitter handle (@Lookuplite) to make these same requests in real time in both public and private conversations. Just Tweet a request @Lookuplite and a response will appear shortly after to service the request. 

Twitter’s partnership will provide a much larger audience to the delivery service, as well as streamline the user experience both on and offline. 

“We want Lookup to be the Google equivalent for finding products and services offline, said Ravindran. “For this, we hyperlink every local store near you with a simple chat app which give you synchronous connection to the verified vendor.”

 

Lookup Looks Forward 

Currently, the app is operational in three local areas throughout India: Bangalore, Mumbai and Delhi. Millions of Indian users are already using the app service to acquire goods and services without making a call, using multiple apps or searching the web. 

“I’m honored to be a part of Deepak’s next big project,” said Stone. “I’m very excited about working with such an inspiring entrepreneur, whom I share common ideologies with.”

Lookup is already pushing forward with new developments including Offline API—a unique concept where users can get access to anything on demand from local merchants. Additionally, the startup is focusing on streamlining the booking process, adding new vendors and building out its user base.  

With a friend like Twitter (or Stone) in the startup’s corner, it’s safe to bet this won’t be the last time Lookup gets noticed. 

January 06, 2016

The Apple Watch Isn't Going Anywhere

 

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The Apple Watch was one of the most profitable gadgets sold throughout this year’s holiday season. According to one report, an estimated 6 million units will be sold by year’s end, making the Apple Watch the most popular wearable on the market.

While some may scoff at the idea of wearable technology, it’s clear that a large number of consumers favor the advancement of flashy phone accessories despite high price tags and minor hiccups from first-generation models. For those on the fence about whether or not these time-keeping wearables are just another fad, the forecast in 2016 looks bright.  

 

What the Numbers Reveal

The wearable market is likely to be dominated by the Apple Watch until 2019—giving the wrist device a wide birth for improvement, as well as more time to grow app development and diversity. According to a report by International Data Corporation (IDC), this year alone Apple sold 13 million watches for a little over 60 percent market share. If these trends continue, by 2019 the total number of units sold will reach almost 50 million.

Edging out some of Apple’s profits will be Android Wear, which sold a modest 3.2 million units this year. However, by 2019, Android will have acquired almost a 40 percent market share—impressive, but certainly a distant second to Apple. 

The numbers strongly suggest the Apple Watch and other wearable devices are headed for greener pastures, but the utility of these devices is still far from necessary in 2016. Most people won’t be able to afford the phone accessory simply because it’s still too expensive and requires newer (more expensive) versions of the iPhone. The next iteration of watches will likely not be much cheaper. Additionally, most people that have an Apple Watch are still using their iPhones just as much as they were before, which, at its core is what wearable tech is all about. 

On the positive side, Apple Watch is listening to consumers and making improvements. It also features some of the most sophisticated health software available. But unless you’re trying to get in shape, keep time, or occasionally respond to a text while driving, few people will benefit in an extraordinary way.

 

So what does all this mean? 

In some ways, the Apple Watch and other wearables are behaving just like a trend first starting out—most people ignore it until it goes away (3D-TVs) or until they simply can’t live without it (cell phones). 

The questioning remaining is whether the Apple Watch will take on enough utility to prove valuable in addition to a cell phone. Right now, the answer is no. But given the nature of the smartphone industry, it’s very possible that developers will come up with new and inventive ways of using technology to solve all kinds of unique problems. 

January 05, 2016

Smartphones Helping Us Cut 180 Million Tonnes of Carbon Emissions

 

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Mobile technology is helping us drastically reduce our C02 emissions, according to a new study from the Carbon Trust. The research, jointly funded by international telephony companies and Global e-Sustainability Initiative (GeSI), claims 180 million tonnes of emissions are saved annually - five times greater than emissions caused by the operations of mobile networks and mobile tech developers.

The study examined 60 carbon-saving mechanisms in 10 different categories, and evaluated a variety of uses for mobile technology, including uses for machine-to-machine and Internet of Things applications.

In an impressive, wide-ranging report, smartphones are shown to have made significant savings in areas like building management, route planning and employee carbon footprints, as an increasing number of workers conduct the majority of their business from home. 

Furthermore, the research highlights a number of areas for future emissions reductions. In a  survey of 4,000 smartphone users from the USA, UK, Spain, Mexico and South Korea, more than half the respondents said they would be willing to reduce their emissions by using mobile technology to recycle more products and encourage insurers to lower premiums in return for more ecologically sound driving habits. Nearly half said they would be more likely to use public transport if they had an app to tell them when the next bus or train would arrive. 

But it’s the emissions savings already being made on a daily basis that is most encouraging. For example, 84% of smartphone users who drive a car regularly use satnav and other GPS apps to reduce congestion and generally plan and execute their trips in a more eco-efficient way; 40% would consider using a self-driving vehicle in the future. Nearly half of respondents said they purchased digital books and newspapers, rather than the more environmentally-costly print versions. 

Other carbon-cutting lifestyle changes that a majority of respondents said they would be willing to make include mobile apps that control home heating and cooling (68%) and mobile-accessed public services (63%). Around half said they would cease using cash and credit/debit cards if they could pay for goods with their smartphone, and 63% said they would consult with doctors remotely for non-urgent issues. 

The list of eco-efficient applications goes on. But what’s even more exciting is the potential for developing economies to completely bypass high-carbon infrastructures by using mobile technology. For a world facing critical climate change, that would be the most sustainable move we can make.

January 04, 2016

Nintendo Launches First Mobile Game

 

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Nintendo fans can finally celebrate their beloved gaming system on their handsets. In March of next year, Nintendo will launch its first-ever mobile app, Miitomo, a communication focused game interface with customizable personal avatars.

Earlier this year, Nintendo announced its partnership with DeNA, a fellow Japanese company focused on mobile apps and development. Together, the duo is committed to bringing Nintendo’s familiar game style to the handsets of millions of users around the world, as well as launching a new online gaming community. 

In addition to its social focus, Miitomo will also focus on entertainment and include internal mini games and other gasification features. There are even discussions about linking the game to users’ Facebook friend lists so that players can communicate with people already in their social spaces. 

Currently, the only revenue potential built into the free-to-play game is clothing users will be able to purchase for their avatar. 

Despite obvious links to the gaming community, Nintendo hasn’t been on the forefront of handset gaming. The partnership with DeNA has been something Nintendo avoided speaking about as recently as January 2014. 

According to Nintendo’s rep at the time, “Nintendo’s intention is not to make Nintendo software available on smart devices.”

Despite Nintendo’s early resistance, the company has made a few things about the mobile developments perfectly clear. For one, DeNA and Nintendo will only be working on original games specifically optimized for the smartphone experience—that means you’re not going to see Mario or Luigi on your handset anytime soon. 

What’s more, all the existing Nintendo IP will be eligible for development by the new license. So, even though Nintendo says no Mario Cart for the iPhone 6S, it’s possible all of that might change sometime in the future. 

 

What the Future Holds

In some ways, it feels like Nintendo is testing the waters before it dives straight into the mobile game world. Depending on how things go with Miitomo, the company may gain some much-needed confidence.

However, all of this raises interesting questions about the success of one gaming platform and its potential success crossing over into new territory. Can Nintendo make a successful game for handsets? Or will it regret the discussion to cross over if Miitomo doesn’t play out to plan?

Nintendo fans should be open-minded come March of next year. They may not get exactly what they’re expecting, but it could be something better.

January 02, 2016

Does Ending a Text with a Period Make You Seem Cold-hearted?

 

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Conveying and registering a wide range of subtle emotions in face-to-face conversations is instinctive. A curl of the lip here, widened eyes there. Facial movements are just so expressive, and our ability to process them so sophisticated, that written communication is fraught with problems caused by their omission. 

Computer-mediated Communication (CMC) has given us plenty of answers to this problem, from emojis and emoticons to gifs and selfies (not to mention Facetime and Skype, which brings us back to picking up on real time facial tics), but one question still plagues texters: if you finish a message with a full stop, does it suggest a degree of callousness to the reader? 

 

Science says yes.

 

A new study led by New York’s Binghamton University has found that SMS messages ending with a period are perceived as less sincere. As part of a paper titled ‘Texting Insincerely: the Role of the Period in Text Messaging,’ researchers presented a group of 126 undergraduates with a series of 16 conversations framed in two different ways: as handwritten notes or as text messages. A typical exchange began with an invitation (“Dave gave me his extra tickets. Wanna come?”) which was followed by a variety of one-word responses (“Okay” and “Sure” etc) each one with or without a period. The results showed that, when the reply is sent via SMS and concluded with a period, subjects rate the response as less sincere than when no punctuation is used. No such effect was reported in the handwritten note samples. 

To slavish devotees of proper grammar, this may come as a surprise. After all, finishing a statement with a period is what was drummed into us at school. It’s the correct way to write english, isn’t it? 

According to the research team, the lack of social cues present in text message communication has imbued punctuation and other keyboard characters with fresh meaning. For a generation of texters, periods convey brusqueness, a sense of finality that seems to ask to be left alone. Without the full stop, the conversation is left open ended, inviting the recipient to continue the dialogue. 

We're not sure how we feel about the period-less sentence, even in a text message. But if you want to indicate an open-ending to your SMS messages and invite further discussion, it's three times quicker than an ellipsis...

December 27, 2015

What Will Happen to Mobile in 2016?

 

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What’s to become of the mobile market in 2016? Said market certainly isn’t going anywhere, and plenty of innovations and changes are expected. Overcoming various hurdles is also in the mix, and with that in mind, check out a few mobile predictions for the New Year: 

 

Messaging App Marketing

Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp are on their way to having 1 billion active users monthly. More services and marketing opportunities will be added to both messenger services in 2016, giving marketers the chance to further break from traditional advertising and come up with unique options. 

 

More Mobile Payments

Paying for, well, anything through smartphones is something that will likely continue in 2016. Apple Pay, Samsung Pay, Android Pay, and similar mobile payment possibilities are set to become standard smartphone features, however undoing years of paying with cash, debit cards, and credit cards as opposed to swiping a smartphone takes diligence. Mobile wallet incentives such as coupons, rewards and loyalty perks, and similar discounts will therefore be required if this form of payment is to really take off. 

 

Increased Data Release

Consumers are predicted to allow more personal data release in 2016, though whether they’ll do it willingly is up for debate. The “convenience and value” of the connected world is something consumers like a lot, so the release of more personal data to publishers and marketers is a distinct possibility. 

 

On-Demand Delivery and Small Businesses

Small businesses will get in on the on-demand delivery action in 2016, something that’s mainly been reserved for corporations and other big businesses. Food ordering, package delivery, and similar easy-to-use services are great for small businesses, and something more of them will utilize in the New Year. 

 

Facebook=Entirely Mobile

The days of checking out Facebook feeds through laptops are increasingly coming to an end, with the social media juggernaut set to become “entirely mobile.” In Q3 2015, 78 percent of Facebook’s $4.3 billion in ad revenue worldwide was due to mobile, and many of the site’s users log in through their phones anyway.

 

Stronger Cybersecurity 

The creation of more cloud-based services and more consumers relying on their phones to purchase goods and services means strong cybersecurity is a must. Small businesses should take note of cybersecurity options, as more cyber attacks are predicted for small businesses in 2016. 

 

Battle For “Mobile Moments”

In a blog for Forrester.com, analyst Thomas Husson called mobile moments the next “battleground” among marketers. 

“Mobile moments – a time when consumers picks up their mobile devices to get what they want in that moment of need – are the next battleground where to win, serve, and retain customers,” he writes. “Mobile experiences are too static today and leverage too little consumer context. As customer expectations of convenience escalate in 2016, the pressure will be on firms to tap new technologies to serve customers in context where they already are – not where brands find it convenient to serve them. Firms must look to use context both to assemble and deliver experiences dynamically on their own and third party platforms.

“In particular, we expect alternative ecosystems beyond Android and iOS to emerge. With consumers using fewer or more integrated apps, new mobile platforms that offer a more relevant experience such as WeChat in China or Facebook Messenger in the US are quickly accumulating power as the owners of vast audiences and rich data about those consumers.”