SMB Marketing Tips

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April 24, 2016

The Global Reach of SMS Messaging

 

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SMS has carved out a place as one of the key marketing tools for the modern business. With affordable, effective application for both B2C and B2B marketing, text messaging is also being used as an internal communication method. If there’s one remote communication technology you can be sure everyone has access to, it’s text messaging.

Therein lies the principal appeal of SMS: it’s universality. Not only do people across the globe have access to SMS, the majority of them carry a phone everywhere, which means that access is readily available, often within minutes of a message being sent. Let’s take a look at the reasons why text messaging is the surest way to reach the largest number of people:

 

  1. Global Reach. There are phone carriers in almost every country in the world, and because SMS works on 2G networks (as well as 3G and 4G), it can be used to communicate with an active mobile phone anywhere in the world
  2. Classless. Unlike other mobile technologies such as apps and geo-location, text messaging doesn’t require a smartphone. Indeed, the SMS protocol predates the advent of the smartphone by more than a decade, which meant it was so widespread by the time everyone started carrying miniature computers in their pocket that it was beyond reproach. No phone manufacturer has even considered not including this simple feature on their phones. The smartest smartphone can communicate with any active cell phone built in the last 20 years in two ways: a phone call or a text message. That’s a pretty level playing field for global communication.
  3. More likely to be read. Than any other form of digital communication. Conservative estimates reckon at least 90% of text messages are read within three minutes of receipt, and unlike emails, they won’t get spam filtered or routinely ignored.
  4. It’s economical. Not just in terms of financial cost, but because of the 160 character limit - a major part of the appeal when it comes to actually reading messages - it requires an economy of language that all marketers should be seeking to use anyway. Your brand message will be clear, concise and direct. It has to be!
  5. It’s permission based. Because consent is required, you know your messages won’t form just another part of the digital white noise we’ve all become used to tuning out on a daily basis. Anyone who receives your SMS messages has requested them, making them much more likely to engage.
  6. It plays well with others. SMS messaging works in harmony with other forms of digital marketing, allowing you to create a truly ‘joined up’ mobile marketing campaign. If, for instance, you have details of an upcoming event on your website, SMS messaging is the perfect way to alert customers to it and include a link to the full story. By incorporating SMS messaging into your overall mobile marketing strategy, you will maximize your reach.

April 17, 2016

Mobile Marketing and the Emoji Question

 

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New research indicates that mobile marketing campaigns are increasingly turning to emojis to make their messages pop. Marketing automation company Appboy surveyed close to 9,400 campaigns on Android and iOS platforms, and found emoji usage had increased more than seven-fold year-on-year, as of March 2016. The report found e-commerce marketers and retailers were the most likely businesses to use emojis in mobile marketing campaigns.

Why are mobile marketing managers using emojis? Simply put, it’s because the rest of us do, and it’s seen as an easy way to add some color and individuality to a campaign. With so much activity happening in the world of mobile marketing, it’s highly competitive and volatile; some 800 million users got their first smartphone last year alone. Another 600 million will join them this year.

With such vast numbers, it’s crucial for e-marketers to understand who they’re trying to reach, and with what kind of message. In this context, emojis become one contributing factor to the success of a mobile marketing campaign. Used well, they set the right tone for a brand image. 

 

Using Emojis

So how do you use them in the most effective way? One of the most common mistakes brands make is to use emojis in place of text, where text would communicate more effectively. Emojis should complement your written message, not replace it, so for your first campaign, try incorporating one or two relevant emojis. This will give you a chance to feel out your audience to see if they respond well to emojis. Not everyone does!

Remember too that a constant stream of unhelpful, if fun, messages will result in irritated customers opting out of your contact list or deleting your app. Don’t get over-excited with the new plaything and start barraging your user base. Stick to the mobile marketing strategy of only issuing messages when you have a special offer to promote, or other information that will be of genuine interest. Incorporate emojis into these, rather than trying to build a new mobile marketing campaign around emojis.

A recent BI Intelligence report takes a look at mobile marketing tactics such as emojis. One of the key findings was the importance of marketers leveraging different tactics according to demographic and audience size. It’s vital to respect the personal nature of mobile messaging, and be highly vigilant for over doing it. Emojis are a good example of mobile marketing tactics that can go wrong if misapplied, but work wonders when done right.

April 04, 2016

How to Give Away a Million Burgers with Mobile Coupons

 

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Recently, the fast food chain Jack in the Box announced it was giving away one million of its new double-stacked, buttery-bun hamburgers. The “Declaration of Delicious” giveaway announcement came in the form of a Superbowl 50 commercial, and was designed to promote the restaurant chain’s new menu. 

 

Coupon Fun … And Fraud?

Consumers had one week to claim their free burgers. Doing so required making a visit to the Jack in the Box website and signing up to receive a mobile coupon for a free Double Jack or Jumbo Jack burger. 

However, coupon fraud is an issue that isn’t going away anytime soon, so how was it possible for one of the biggest burger chains in the United States to give away one million burgers without more than a few people claiming more than a few coupons? 

 

The Mobile Coupon Solution

In the old days, print coupons would have made the Jack in the Box giveaway a prime target for fraud. Today’s mobile coupons have all but eradicated the issue, with Jack in the Box combining online and offline tools to sidestep fraud-related problems. The restaurant chain sent redeemable codes over text or email to those who signed up to receive the coupon; the codes featured expiration dates. Guests had to either bring the printed versions of the online coupon to the restaurant, or show the codes to a staff member on a mobile device. 

 

What Consumers Preferred

Unsurprisingly, guests overwhelmingly favored the mobile version of the Jack in the Box coupons. Research by CodeBroker noted 70 percent to 80 percent of emailed coupons are viewed on mobile phones, while 20 percent to 30 percent of said coupons get printed. Overall, pulling up a coupon code is considered to be much easier than taking the time to print it.

In terms of email and SMS, consumers generally prefer receiving coupon codes via SMS. The percentage of those who indicate SMS as their favored methods for receiving deals and discounts has continued to rise over the past few years, something that’s very likely to continue. 

 

A Few Suggestions

The Jack in the Box promotion offers several lessons for marketers looking to refine their mobile tactics. For example, it’s been suggested that the restaurant chain emphasized its mobile app as a means of obtaining mobile coupons directly, as higher redemption rates come from app coupons, according to CodeBroker. Another suggestion marketers might consider for their own mobile marketing campaigns is one-time-use coupons at checkout. Generic promo codes generally result in more fraud.

Jack in the Box also missed a golden opportunity to collect information on consumer behavior throughout its burger campaign, starting with issuance and followed by redemption, location, and expiration. One-time-use coupons provide the chance to collect such analytics, and allow for tailored demographic segmentation and new campaign re-targeting. 

What’s the moral of this mobile marketing story? Jack in the Box did a fine job with its mobile marketing campaign, but failed to capitalize on a few key avenues. Mobile marketers would do well to fill in these holes in their own efforts. 

 

March 23, 2016

Do Good Week: Maintaining a Positive Company Culture

 

As part of this year's 'Do Good Week' we take a look at how you can inspire and maintain a positive company culture. 

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In order to do well in business, you need to maintain a positive company culture. What is a company culture and how do you create one that positively impacts your business, and therefore your customers? Company culture is a shared set of visions and values for the betterment of the company and those it serves, and it’s a collective effort to uphold those visions and values through every business decision and action.

 

Examples of a Positive Company Culture

A positive company culture is seen in the way leadership communicates with employees, in the enthusiasm employees have when performing their jobs, and in the effectiveness of the company to better the lives of its customers. Companies like The Disney Store have created a positive company culture by taking into consideration all of the above-mentioned points, and companies that are successful in creating a positive culture tend to experience enormous success.

 

The Importance of Positive Company Culture

It’s important that a company’s founder set the tone for a positive culture from day one. His or her visions and values can then be passed on to first-hire leadership, employee teams that are built subsequently, and any vendors or merchants that are representative of the company. It’s crucial that anyone who joins the company, in any capacity, is aware of the positive company culture that has been built and prepared to help maintain it. 

A positive company culture must be practiced and on display at all times in order to keep the business thriving. This means that anyone who is not on board with the culture that the company has created needs to decide to adopt a new attitude or face the consequences. Culture is that dire for a business’ success. 

 

How to Create and Maintain a Positive Company Culture

The culture a company creates for employees, and for customers, will be slightly different from one business to the next because of factors like the nature of business, the business’ target audience, and business location, among others. However, in the end, a positive company culture will be focused on a few things, including clear communication, fair dealing, and the happiness of employees and customers. The following are some goals a business can focus on to create a company culture that benefits management, shareholders, employees, and customers:

 

Recruit the Right People

To create a positive company culture, start with a leadership team that understands and embraces the business’ vision and values, and then make sure everyone who comes on board in any other capacity is clear and accepting of the culture. When you screen employees, hold willingness to uphold your company’s culture as a “must.” This will help your business by getting the right people into your company from day one, which means less turnover later. 

 

Commit to Orientations and Ongoing Training

Make it a requirement that every person who comes to work for your company go through an orientation that specifically addresses the company culture you’ve created. Also, make periodic training classes a requirement so that employees can receive updates to your visions and values (as they might change according to the state of an evolving business) and reminders about your company’s ultimate goals. 

In addition to these methods of maintaining a positive company culture, it’s a good idea to foster company-wide communication at every level, consider recognition and awards programs for those who go above and beyond in upholding your business’ values, and generate an atmosphere of caring in which employees feel connected and comfortable with each other, like a family. 

 

March 18, 2016

TCPA Court Cases Resulting Favorably for Text Marketing Companies

 

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Less than four years have elapsed since the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) adapted the Telephone Consumer Protections Act (TCPA) to include text messaging. When the changes to the TCPA were first announced in 2012, text marketers - and companies that use text marketing services - were concerned that the changes would have a negative impact on their business models. To an extent, they’ve been proven right - but the fallout has been largely confined to the inconvenience of facing down and defeating lawsuits, rather than actually losing them.

In fact, since 2012, there have been five major court decisions to have gone the way of text message marketers. Far from wreaking havoc on the text marketing industry, the updated TCPA has had the effect of protecting honest business practices, and the aforementioned court decisions could set crucial precedents for the future. 

First, a brief recap of the story so far:

Created in 1991, the TCPA required businesses to gain express written consent before making automated phone calls. In 2012, the FCC took the view that consumers should have similar protections from automated text messages.

Initially, mobile marketers were not worried by the update. The concept of ‘prior express written consent’ was a core tenet of text message marketing. One of the reasons mobile marketing has been so successful is that it came of age well after the irritation of spam emails and late night robocalls had been felt by everyone. It simply didn’t make good business sense to follow that model for SMS. The majority of practitioners of text marketing were already doing what the law now required of them.

This was precisely the problem. The FCC’s new rules used language that could be interpreted as an invalidation of existing consent agreements. Because those agreements had not previously been required by law, companies’ record-keeping was not as good as it could have been. The quibble between the FCC and telemarketers came down to whether or not new consent was required from existing B2C relationships.

So far, the legal system has sympathized with companies who had gained consent prior to the legislation. The most high profile example was an action brought against Microsoft. In a ruling on November 17th 2015, Judge Manuel Real of the United States District Court for the Central District of California granted Microsoft’s motion to dismiss the lawsuit brought by two plaintiffs claiming the company did not seek fresh consent after the TCPA update. Judge Real wrote in his judgement: 

“Plaintiffs voluntarily sought specific information about Microsoft promotions, providing both their phone numbers and their express consent to receive that information by texting specific keywords from their mobile phones. There is no cognizable legal theory that could support liability against Defendants, and dismissal with prejudice is appropriate.”

In other words, he deemed the lawsuit frivolous - a cynical ploy by the plaintiffs to extract damages from a huge tech company. Text marketers everywhere hope this - along with a handful of other cases - sets a precedent that will prevent future litigation and allow fair business to carry on unobstructed.

February 19, 2016

SMS and the Customer Experience

 

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Did you know texting has been around for nearly 20 years? It’s hard to imagine life without it, and yet only recently have big businesses started to pay close attention to text and SMS messaging. Which makes you wonder, why now? What are they up to?

 

Texting Tipping Point 

The Pew Research Center reports that texting is the most frequently used app on a cell phone—97 percent of Americans use texting at least once a day. When compared to average email open rates (20 percent), text messages score significantly higher at 98 percent.

The numbers all point toward mobile, which is no surprise in 2016; the difference between what marketers know today versus 5 years ago is that the customer experience now begins is the palm of the hand. 

There are several reasons that businesses are more inclined to entertain SMS messaging. First, 15 years ago, a basic SMS plan was expensive: 10 – 20 cents a message. Thanks to unlimited text messaging, texting is more affordable. 

Additionally, the devices we use to text now are much more sophisticated. Remember typing messages using the number pad and T9? Today, most cell phones are equipped with full keyboards that make texting faster and more efficient. These factors have made it much more cost efficient for businesses to utilize texting in a meaningful way. 

 

Big Business Learns to Text 

So, what exactly are companies planning to do with texting? 

Big businesses are focusing on existing customer behavior, which in this case means texting. Based on statistical data, businesses view texting as the preferred form of communication. Instead of asking customers to call a 1-800 number, they’re going to meet customers where they already are—via text.  

There are three ways texting will be integrated into big business to ensure the customer experience is managed from this new mobile point. 

First, contact centers will incorporate SMS messaging with traditional voice calls to help customers solve problems faster, reduce wait times, and follow up. Normally, an agent handles calls one at a time; with texting, an agent can take multiple inquires simultaneously, effectively reducing wait times and increasing productivity. 

Second, smart notifications will be used as reminders and to set up appointments. 

Finally, desk phone messaging will bridge SMS messaging and MMS into a regular desk telephone, giving mobile employees access to multiple text sessions at the same time. 

 

Text to Buy 

Ironically, the social behavior of texting hasn’t chanced the customer’s experience; rather it has changed customer’s expectations about what that experience should be. In this case, texting is the path of least resistance to settle all kinds of customer issues. However, it’s also open season for innovation and integration of new technologies that will allow customers to buy things via text—something I predict we’ll see a lot more of in the near future. 

 

 

 

February 05, 2016

Can Mobile Tech Solve Long Lines at the Grocery Store?

 

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Retailers are regularly on the lookout for ways to improve the customer experience and cut costs—if there’s a way to do both at the same time, that’s even better. One emerging trend in this area involves utilizing mobile technology to help expedite certain transactions. Tech companies, restaurant chains, clothing stores, and more businesses have implemented cloud-based point-of-sale (POS) systems in an effort to reduce long lines and other potentially problematic retail behaviors.

 

What Is a Cloud-based POS System?

 

Traditionally, when you go to the grocery store, the final step in your customer service journey includes the interaction you have with a checker tending a stationary till at the front of the store. The number of checkers and cash registers is limited by the resources available. As a result, customers might have to wait in long lines to make their purchases. If this sounds like a familiar scene, you’re not alone.

 

What is less familiar (but currently growing in popularity) is the mobile POS system, which manages transactions and other customer-related actions exclusively online. As a result, the transaction is accessed remotely using a mobile technology device like a smartphone, tablet, or iPad. 

 

Is a Cloud-based POS System Safe? 

 

Customers not accustomed to making purchases online might find the mobile POS a little intimidating, especially if they’re fearful of online corruption or attacks. For customers who are comfortable with making online purchases, the process is only slightly different from buying goods at popular online retailers like Amazon or eBay. 

 

For customers, cloud-based POS systems are just as secure as traditional transaction methods. Security features include encryptions and fire walls to protect incoming and outgoing personal data. 

 

From a retailer’s perspective, the shift to a mobile POS system actually mitigates some risk of fraudulent activity. In the future, credit card companies are expected to make good on all purchases (even fraudulent purchases) so long as the vendor has upgraded to a mobile system. 

 

A Better Customer Experience 

 

One of the greatest advantages of using a mobile POS is that customers can make purchases from anywhere in the store. Moreover, with sales associates standing by, customers can get answers and assistance for a broader range of needs, including inventory, warranty specifics, price checks, and more. 

 

By making this information mobile, retailers stand to save money on overhead while simultaneously making more money on the sales floor. Imagine how much potential business is lost because a customer doesn’t want to wait in line to ask an inventory question. By offering a mobile solution, associates can deliver expedited service to customers that would otherwise never make it to checkout. Meanwhile, giving sales associates more flexibility on the floor will make them more productive and likely reduce the number of required sales associates.  

It’s not a matter of if retailers will decide to make the switch to mobile POS; it’s really a matter of when. Several retailers have already made the transition and are offering customers a wide range of transaction options like mobile receipts and quicker checkout times. As the technology develops further, this trend will become as prolific as retail stores themselves, ultimately changing the way we do business on a daily basis. 

 

January 31, 2016

The Best Ways to Monetize Apps

 

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Knowing which monetizing strategy will work best for a mobile app is like trying to figure out what’s in the secret sauce atop your favorite burger. You can see bits and pieces of familiar condiments and spices, but when you try to make it at home, it’s never exactly the same. Maybe that’s because there isn’t a one-size-fits-all solution, or secret sauce, for monetizing apps. 

As strange or cliché as this hamburger analogy sounds, it’s safe to say that most burger recipes are uniquely their own; and that’s typically the way all successful apps find their way to the top of the charts. Creating a unique app is most certainly the first step in creating a viable monetization strategy—your secret sauce—and your ticket to a wildly successful app. 

If no two apps are exactly the same, it’s logical to assume that no two apps make money in exactly the same way either. There is, however, a good chance that most successful apps use similar strategies, in a variety of combinations, to optimize strengths and dull app weaknesses. Understanding which mobile marketing strategy - or combination of mobile marketing strategies - will be most effective for your brand is a core requirement for success. 

Here’s a look at some of the best ways to monetize apps using popular strategies. Think of these techniques like you would ingredients to the secret sauce on your burger. Ask yourself what works best with your app, and try combinations until you’ve made something delicious…I mean profitable. 

 

Freemium Apps 

It’s a play on words, and it also accounts for 93 percent of all downloaded apps in 2015. Freemium apps are just what they sound like—they’re free. So, in order to use this ingredient effectively, your app had better offer a premium, or upgraded version, for a small fee. 

This strategy only works well, though, when there are clear advantages to the paid version; it also has be to a first-rate, highly useable, and addictive app. If this sounds like your burger, then feel free to say it’s free; but be sure you’ve got a better version of the app available for purchase. 

 

In-app Purchases

Depending on the meat of your app—the genre, if you will—in-app purchases are a great seasoning to add. The trick here is to make a game that’s highly addictive and charge users small fees to enhance their addictive experience with features like profile personalization, game currency, or increased usage. 

Once a user makes the first purchase, he or she is usually hooked. Game apps like Candy Crush Saga made an estimated $630 thousand a day with this technique. You can, too, if you make an appetizing app. 

 

In-app Advertising

Think of in-app advertising like you would an assertive spice blend—use too much, and your burger is ruined. Successful in-app advertising does two things: compliments multiple ad networks and functions within well-designed ad space. 

In other words, in-app advertising should not be the only revenue source holding your app together. Additionally, thoughtful and strategic ad placement is very important to the ad’s success. An occasional banner add at the bottom of your favorite app isn’t so bad; pop-up ads flashing across your smartphone screen every 30 seconds are not the way to go. 

 

Sponsorship 

Finally, sponsorship is a great way to offer products or services most relevant to your consumer. Prominently displayed sponsors will pay for both impressions and clicks if this strategy is implemented correctly. 

The important thing to remember about this monetizing tactic is that what you’re selling, and when, is critical to the user’s experience and general acceptance of the advertisement. 

For example, the RunKeeper fitness app partnered with third party Kiip to showcase products that would appeal most to runners, particularly during times the app was aware the runner had just started or completed a run. Timing is everything, and sponsorship monetization needs that and good products to be successful. 

Building your app’s unique monetization strategy will require some trial and error; but the payout for the time investment can make all the difference in your journey. What’s in your secret sauce?

January 30, 2016

What is Sales Force Automation?

 

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Before the proliferation of digitalized communications, records, and processes, pen and paper were the sophisticated tools of the trade for most sales associates. A Rolodex, for example, is the tangible version of most contact lists we use today on our mobile devices and computers—without which, most professionals could hardly function. 

Today, the job of the sales associate is greatly helped by the advancement of Sale Force Automation (SFA); which covers an array or responsibilities that empower sales professionals to work more efficiently from just about anywhere in the world. 

 

How Does Sales Force Automation Work? 

At its most basic level, SFA is software designed to organize customer data, record customer interactions, and deliver insight on short- and long-term sales behavior. 

Between the early 1980s to Y2K, SFA began to incorporate more aspects of the sales process including, web-based contact list, e-mail packages, custom templates and more. By automating the sales process and digitizing the data, sales methods became more specialized and, over time, increasingly more successful. 

 

Customer Relations Management 

Software companies like Oracle, Baan, and Microsoft pioneered the industry and helped bridge the gap between SFA and Customer Relations Management (CRM). 

In the early 2000s, Paul Greenberg published CRM at the Speed of Light, which helped guide the notion that CRM should include a company’s overarching strategies, practices and technologies aimed at building customer relationships as well as driving sales.  Eventually, CRM and SFA became intertwined—with SFA focusing on the systems and software, and CRM focusing on the analytics of the customer lifecycle. 

Today, CRM includes things like social CRM, which aims to prioritize customer interaction over customer transactions across different media channels. However, CRM also includes things like customer retention rates, online shopping trends, email open rates, and other data points that improve business relations, drive sales, and curate a strong customer base. 

 

The Future of SFA

Because sales associates are no longer sitting behind a desk making phone calls all day; many of them work exclusively in the field, the future of SFA as well as some combination of CRM will inevitably include features specific to mobile devices. This includes formatting sales catalogues and brochures or mobile, digitalized forms, paperwork and signatures, as well as streamlining the purchasing process to maximize efficacy in the field. 

Further, these mobile solutions will continue to assist sales professionals with traditional SFA tasks like managing appointments, rescheduling, and record keeping. 

Just like other business tools and systems, mobility is essential to the future of SFA. Sales teams are made of increasingly on-the-go professionals, who need devices that reflect this change in professional behavior. Thus, mobile is not only the future, it’s the present hot spot in sales and customer management. 

 

December 27, 2015

What Will Happen to Mobile in 2016?

 

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What’s to become of the mobile market in 2016? Said market certainly isn’t going anywhere, and plenty of innovations and changes are expected. Overcoming various hurdles is also in the mix, and with that in mind, check out a few mobile predictions for the New Year: 

 

Messaging App Marketing

Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp are on their way to having 1 billion active users monthly. More services and marketing opportunities will be added to both messenger services in 2016, giving marketers the chance to further break from traditional advertising and come up with unique options. 

 

More Mobile Payments

Paying for, well, anything through smartphones is something that will likely continue in 2016. Apple Pay, Samsung Pay, Android Pay, and similar mobile payment possibilities are set to become standard smartphone features, however undoing years of paying with cash, debit cards, and credit cards as opposed to swiping a smartphone takes diligence. Mobile wallet incentives such as coupons, rewards and loyalty perks, and similar discounts will therefore be required if this form of payment is to really take off. 

 

Increased Data Release

Consumers are predicted to allow more personal data release in 2016, though whether they’ll do it willingly is up for debate. The “convenience and value” of the connected world is something consumers like a lot, so the release of more personal data to publishers and marketers is a distinct possibility. 

 

On-Demand Delivery and Small Businesses

Small businesses will get in on the on-demand delivery action in 2016, something that’s mainly been reserved for corporations and other big businesses. Food ordering, package delivery, and similar easy-to-use services are great for small businesses, and something more of them will utilize in the New Year. 

 

Facebook=Entirely Mobile

The days of checking out Facebook feeds through laptops are increasingly coming to an end, with the social media juggernaut set to become “entirely mobile.” In Q3 2015, 78 percent of Facebook’s $4.3 billion in ad revenue worldwide was due to mobile, and many of the site’s users log in through their phones anyway.

 

Stronger Cybersecurity 

The creation of more cloud-based services and more consumers relying on their phones to purchase goods and services means strong cybersecurity is a must. Small businesses should take note of cybersecurity options, as more cyber attacks are predicted for small businesses in 2016. 

 

Battle For “Mobile Moments”

In a blog for Forrester.com, analyst Thomas Husson called mobile moments the next “battleground” among marketers. 

“Mobile moments – a time when consumers picks up their mobile devices to get what they want in that moment of need – are the next battleground where to win, serve, and retain customers,” he writes. “Mobile experiences are too static today and leverage too little consumer context. As customer expectations of convenience escalate in 2016, the pressure will be on firms to tap new technologies to serve customers in context where they already are – not where brands find it convenient to serve them. Firms must look to use context both to assemble and deliver experiences dynamically on their own and third party platforms.

“In particular, we expect alternative ecosystems beyond Android and iOS to emerge. With consumers using fewer or more integrated apps, new mobile platforms that offer a more relevant experience such as WeChat in China or Facebook Messenger in the US are quickly accumulating power as the owners of vast audiences and rich data about those consumers.”